Thursday, August 17, 2017

Aug. 17, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Step by Step

Step by Step
Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

"A lot of lost dreams, empty futures and crazy things of the past went through my mind. One night, I was struck with the memory of a line Alan Ladd used in 'Shane,' a movie that I'd worked on. He told a villain, 'The trouble is, old man, you've lived too long.' How that line echoed through my mind! I knew why I identified. It was MY line, the story of MY life. I'd lived too long and become a loser, dependent on booze. Well, at least I could drink myself to death. Real soon. Then everyone would be sorry for me." - Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, 1976, "They Stopped in Time," Ch 3 ("Those Golden Years"), p 333.

Today, no asking if I have lived too long or too briefly and if I am predestined to "drink myself to death," exiting the world with everyone feeling "sorry" for me. Is this the legacy for which I have lived my life? If I want and expect better, and whether I am sober or drinking today, AA has given me the tools to build the legacy that will remain after I am gone. And the program promises better than being remembered as the "poor soul" who wasted a lifetime and died an alcoholic's death. Through AA, I can craft my legacy to be someone who rose from an alcoholic's gutter and re-crafted himself as a person who sobered up and sought to help the person who became helpless and hopeless. But I cannot think in terms of my final legacy. It is built 24 Hours at a time. Today, I focus on what my legacy is now. And our common journey continues. Step by step. - Chris M., 2017

Aug. 17, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Twenty-Four Hours a Day

Twenty-Four Hours a Day
Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

AA Thought for the Day
"To one who feels he is an atheist or agnostic, a spiritual experience seems impossible, but to continue as he is means disaster. To be doomed to an alcoholic death or to live on a spiritual basis are not always easy alternatives to face. But we have to face the fact that we must find a spiritual basis of life - or else. Lack of power is our dilemma. We have to find a power by which we can live, and it has to be a power greater than ourselves."

Have I found that power by which I can live?

Meditation for the Day
Sunshine is the laughter of nature. Live out in the sunshine. The sun and air are good medicine. Nature is a good nurse for tired bodies. Let her have her way with you. God's grace is like the sunshine. Let your whole being be enwrapped in the Divine spirit. Faith is the soul's breathing in of the Divine spirit. It makes glad the hearts of human beings. The Divine spirit heals and cures the mind. Let it have its way and all will be well.

Prayer for the Day
I pray that I may live in the sunshine of God's spirit. I pray that my mind and soul may be energized by it.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 17, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: A Day at a Time

A Day at a Time
Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

Reflection for the Day
The Fourth Step suggests we make a searching and fearless moral inventory - not an immoral inventory of ourselves. The Steps are guidelines to recovery, not whipping posts for self-flagellation. Taking my inventory doesn't mean concentrating on my shortcomings until all the good is hidden from view. By the same token, recognizing the good need not be an act of pride or conceit. If I recognize my good qualities as God-given, I can take an inventory with true humility while experiencing satisfaction in what is pleasant, loving and generous in me.

Will I try to believe, in Walt Whitman's words, that "I am larger, better than I thought; I did not know I held so much goodness ..."?

Today I Pray
When I find good things about myself, as I undertake this inner archaeological dig, may I give credit where it is due - to God, who is the giver of all good. May I appreciate whatever is good about me with humility, as a gift from God.

Today I Will Remember
Goodness is a gift from God.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 17, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: The Eye Opener

The Eye Opener
Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

As startling as this may sound to some members, AA has no first-, second- or third-class memberships. A sober member is in good standing if he has been dry for twenty-four hours or twenty-four months.

Of course, no one means to discriminate, but some of us just naturally gravitate to a certain person or group of persons within the group. The "low-bottoms" are just as guilty as the "high-bottoms" in this respect. After all, we were all drunks and all of us smelled the same when we came in.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 17, 2017 - Good morning to a beautiful Thursday and renewed faith, hope, courage and strength


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Aug. 16, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Today's Gift from Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017
Today's thought from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is:

I am determined to maintain the perpendicular position.
 -- Lucy Stone


Perpendicular lines make right angles; they make possible extensions of both height and breadth. Right angles are weight bearing. We speak of asserting something "squarely," making perpendiculars.

People who speak their minds freely and assert their individuality feel perpendicular; the corners they create, by their points of view, are sturdy and open. Others can use them to build structures on.

It's important to claim the perpendicular, even though we may feel pressured into curved or parallel positions. If we're centered in ourselves, others won't throw us off balance. Each of us needs to find our own center so that we can occupy our own place. Others will recognize us. Together we'll build high and wide.

My remotest ancestors dared to point their spines upright. I'll carry on the project they began.
You are reading from the book:
The Promise of a New Day by Karen Casey & Martha Vanceburg. © 1983, 1991 by Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 16, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Step by Step

Step by Step
Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017

"I came to AA simply because there were no other doors of help open to me. In AA, I have had to be torn down and then put back together differently. No one could live such an irresponsible, immature life as I had without consequences. AA made it possible for me to face the consequences of my past actions. After I came to AA, I was divorced by my wife; I lost my practice; I was legally restrained from seeing my children; I went broke ...Only AA kept me from running away." - Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, 1976, "They Stopped in Time," Ch 14 ("Growing Up All Over Again"), p 420.

Today, taking up an AA recovery program in and of itself does not excuse me from responsibility to the consequences of my drinking - nor should it. In facing those consequences, my life in early recovery may become even more difficult than it was when I was drinking because recovery may require complete reconstruction of my entire being. Part of that rebuilding may be to answer for my misconduct of my drinking days. If I am in the position of accountability although I am not drinking, the purpose of my AA program in part is to give me the tools to accept responsibility and consequences without a slip or relapse. And in taking responsibility and paying whatever dues I owe, I may be able to see myself grow into sobriety by clearing away the garbage of my drinking days. If today should be one of judgment for me, I will embrace it as an opportunity to be done with the bad once and for all and move forward by accepting whatever may be my just due. And our common journey continues. Step by step. - Chris M., 2017

Aug. 16, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Twenty-Four Hours a Day

Twenty-Four Hours a Day
Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017

AA Thought for the Day
"The alcoholic is absolutely unable to stop drinking on the basis of self-knowledge. We must admit we can do nothing about it ourselves. Willpower and self-knowledge will never help in the strange mental blank spots when we are tempted to drink. An alcoholic mentally is in a very sick condition. The last flicker of conviction that we can do the job ourselves must be snuffed out. The spiritual answer and the program of action are the only hope. Only spiritual principles will solve our problems. We are completely helpless apart from Divine help. Our defense against drinking must come from a Higher Power."
Have I accepted the spiritual answer and the program of action?

Meditation for the Day
Rest now until life, eternal life, flowing through your veins and heart and mind, bids you to bestir yourself. Then glad work will follow. Tired work is never effective. The strength of God's spirit is always available to the tired mind and body. He is your physician and your healer. Look to these quiet times of communion with God for rest, for peace, for cure. Then rise refreshed in spirit and go out to work, knowing that your strength is able to meet any problems because it is reinforced by God's power.

Prayer for the Day
I pray that the peace I have found will make me effective. I pray that I may be relieved of all strain during this day.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 16, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: A Day at a Time

A Day at a Time
Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017

Reflection for the Day
Inventory-taking isn't always done in red ink. It's a rare day when we haven't done something right. As I uncover and face my shortcomings, my many good qualities will be revealed to me also, reminding me that they have the same reality as my faults. Even when we've tried hard and failed, for instance, we can chalk that up as one of the greatest credits of all. I'll try to appreciate my good qualities, because they not only offset the faults, but give me a foundation on which to grow. It's just as self-deceptive to discount what's good in us as to justify what is not.
Can I take comfort in my positive qualities, accepting myself as a friend?

Today I Pray
If I find only defects when I look in that Fourth Step mirror, may I be sure that I am missing something - namely my good points. Although my ultra-modesty may be approved socially, may I learn that it is just as dishonest as rationalizing away my faults. Even an out-and-out failure, if examined from all sides, may turn up a plus along with the obvious minuses.

Today I Will Remember
To give myself, if not an A for effort, at least an average B minus.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 16, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: The Eye Opener

The Eye Opener
Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017

The older some of us get in AA, the more we notice a tendency on our part to become a little bit less tolerant, a little less understanding in our relationship with the man still having trouble. We have been so long removed from the actual suffering that we are losing some of our understanding.

This is a good time to pick out the messiest case we can find and get back in the groove again. We can't afford to forget that we, too, are alcoholics and, but for the Grace of God, we would be in just as bad shape.

We may be years away from our last drunk, but we are only one drink away from our next one. Don't lose the common touch.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 16, 2017 - Rise 'n shine for a Wednesday of renewed faith, hope, courage and strength


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Aug. 15, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Today's Gift from Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017
Today's thought from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is:

Friendship and Love

Friendships or marriages based on "dire need" or physical security are doomed to fail if each person in the relationship does not grow beyond his or her limited ways of thinking and reacting.

The ideal relationship is one in which each partner strives to grow. It is an ever-expanding commitment, mutually supportive of healthy interdependence. A healthy relationship encourages the seeking of wider mental and spiritual horizons; it is never threatened permanently by them.

TODAY Do I give my loved ones enough room to grow? Do I encourage my friends or mate to do things without me? Am I threatened by change or do I welcome it? Do I have the courage to do things on my own, even if my loved ones do not give me support? Do I have the courage and consideration to share my changes with those I love?

Let the purpose of all marriages and friendships alike be the deepening of the spirit and the enrichment of the soul.
You are reading from the book:
The Reflecting Pond by Liane Cordes. © 1981 by Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 15, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Step by Step

Step by Step
Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

"To my mind, drinking didn't have anything to do with not going through with things. I don't know whether I drank to cover up being a failure, or whether I drank and then missed the deals. I was able to rationalize it anyway. I can well remember over a long period of years when I thought I was the only person in the world who knew that sooner or later I was going to get drunk." - Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, 1976, "Personal Stories," Ch 2 ("He Had to be Shown"), p 198.

Today, no wasting physical or emotional energy on asking, "Why me?" Did I drink because I was a failure, or maybe to celebrate being successful and I "earned" the right to drink? Or maybe I couldn't overcome some devastating loss and collapsed into a heap of self-pity or bruised ego. More likely the reason was that I was a predestined alcoholic and, more likely, I barreled toward masochistic self-destruction. Today, in recovery, "Why me?" is no longer relevant because what is, is, and the First Step of admitting I am powerless makes "Why me?" a pointless question. Today, instead of lamenting why I am an alcoholic, I'll focus on the program that keeps me a sober one. And our common journey continues. Step by step. - Chris M., 2017

Aug. 15, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Twenty-Four Hours a Day

Twenty-Four Hours a Day
Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

AA Thought for the Day
"Once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic. Commencing to drink after a period of sobriety, we are in a short time as bad as ever. If we have admitted we are alcoholics, we must have no reservations of any kind, nor any lurking notion that some day we will be immune to alcohol. What sort of thinking dominates an alcoholic who repeats time after time the desperate experience of the first drink? Parallel with sound reasoning, there inevitably runs some insanely trivial excuse for taking the first drink. There is little thought of what the terrific consequences may be."

Have I given up all excuses for taking a drink?

Meditation for the Day
"Where two or three are banded together, I will be there in the midst of them." When God finds two or three people in union, who only want His will to be done, who want only to serve Him, He has a plan that can be revealed to them. The grace of God can come to people who are together in one place with one accord. A union like this is miracle-working. God is able to use such people. Only good can come through such consecrated people, brought together in unified groups for a single purpose and of a single mind.

Prayer for the Day
I pray that I may be part of a unified group. I pray that I may contribute my share to its consecrated purpose.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 15, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: A Day at a Time

A Day at a Time
Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

Reflection for the Day
It's often said that you can't tell a book by its cover. For many of us, our "covers" or surface records haven't looked all that bad; it seemed at first that making an inventory would be "a breeze." As we proceeded, we were dismayed to discover that our "covers" were relatively blemish-free only because we'd deeply buried our defects beneath layers of self-deception. For that reason, self-searching can be a long-term process; it must go on for as long as we remain blind to the flaws that ambushed us into addiction and misery.
Will I try to face myself as I am, correcting whatever is keeping me from growing into the person I want to be?

Today I Pray
May God aid me in my soul-searching, because I have hidden my faults neatly from friends, family and especially myself. If I feel more "sinned against, than sinning," may I take it as a clue that I need to dig deeper for the real me.

Today I Will Remember
Taking stock of myself is buying stock in my future.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 15, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: The Eye Opener

The Eye Opener
Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

Frequently people who are only sober in AA try to carry our Message to other alcoholics without realizing that, if you have only sobriety, you can only carry sobriety. In order to carry the AA way of life, you must live the AA way of life.

The fact that you are sober doesn't imply that you are on the Program. In fact, many outside of AA have longer periods of sobriety behind them than anyone in AA. They started before AA was started. Whether in or out of AA, if you have sobriety only, you are a dried-up drunk in my book.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 15, 2017 - Rise 'n shine to a Tuesday of invigorated faith, hope, strength and courage


Monday, August 14, 2017

Aug. 14, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Today's Gift from Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Monday, Aug. 14, 2017
Today's thought from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is:

Reflection for the Day
It was far easier for me to accept my powerlessness over my addiction than it was for me to accept the notion that some sort of Higher Power could accomplish that which I had been unable to accomplish myself. Simply by seeking help and accepting the fellowship of others similarly afflicted, the craving left me. And I realized that if I was doing what I was powerless alone to do, then surely I was doing so by some Power outside my own and obviously greater.
Have I surrendered my life into the hands of God?

Today I Pray
May God erase in me the arrogant pride which keeps me from listening. May my unhealthy dependence on chemicals and my clinging dependence on those near by be transformed into reliance on God. Only in this kind of dependence - reliance - on a Higher Power will I find my own transformation.

Today I Will Remember
I am God-dependent.
You are reading from the book:
A Day at a Time © 1989 by Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 14, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Step by Step

Step by Step
Monday, Aug. 14, 2017

"Those of us who have spent much time in the world of spiritual make-believe have eventually seen the childishness of it. This dream world has been replaced by a great sense of purpose, accompanied by a growing consciousness of the power of God in our lives. We have come to believe He would like us to keep our heads in the clouds with Him, but that our feet ought to be firmly planted on earth. That is where our fellow travelers are, and that is where our work must be done. These are the realities for us." - Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, 1976, Ch 9 ("The Family Afterward"), p 130.

Today, the spiritual component of recovery is little more than faith without works if I fail to utilize it in service to the addict who still suffers, and if I neglect my responsibility to my spiritual development. That responsibility is, in part, strict adherence to my own program while allowing others in recovery their program that works for them, and in actively seeking participation in program and group affairs before being asked. What I have received in the program is not mine alone, and it cannot and will not grow if I keep it to myself. This is the essential expression of spirituality at work  - to share with someone how the program led me to where I am now while helping them to find their way. I may think I have a spiritual connection with my higher power but, if I limit my contentment to myself, my faith is dead without works. And our common journey continues. Step by step. - Chris M., 2017

Aug. 14, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Twenty-Four Hours a Day

Twenty-Four Hours a Day
Monday, Aug. 14, 2017

AA Thought for the Day
"None of us like to think that we are bodily and mentally different from others. Our drinking careers have been characterized by countless vain attempts to prove that we could drink like other people. This delusion that we are like other people has to be smashed. It has been definitely proved that no real alcoholic has ever recovered control. Over any considerable period we get worse, never better. There is no such thing as making a normal drinker out of an alcoholic."

Am I convinced that I can never drink again normally?

Meditation for the Day
We should have life and have it more abundantly - spiritual, mental, physical, abundant life - joyous, powerful life. These we can have if we follow the right way. Not all people will accept from God the gift of an abundant life, a gift held out free to all. Not all people care to stretch out a hand and take it. God's gift, the richest He has to offer, is the precious gift of abundant life. People often turn away from it, reject it, and will have none of it. Do not let this be true of you.

Prayer for the Day
I pray that I may hasten to accept the gift of abundant spiritual life. I pray that I may live the good life to the best of my ability.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 14, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: A Day at a Time

A Day at a Time
Monday, Aug. 14, 2017

Reflection for the Day
Step Four enables me to see myself as I really am - my characteristics, motives, attitudes and actions. I'm taught in The Program to search out my mistakes resolutely. Where, for example, had I been selfish, dishonest, self-seeking, and frightened? I'm taught, also, that my deeply-rooted habit of self-justification may tempt me to "explain away" each fault as I uncover it, blaming others for my own shortcomings.
Will I believe that personal honesty can achieve what superior knowledge often cannot?

Today I Pray
May I not make the Fourth Step a once-over-lightly, let's-get-it-over-with exercise in self-appraisal. May I know that, once I take this Step, I must review it again many times until it becomes, like the other eleven, a way of life for me. May I protect the value of my Fourth Step from my old habit of head-tripping and buck-passing my way out of responsibility.

Today I Will Remember
Personal honesty paves the way to recovery.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 14, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: The Eye Opener

The Eye Opener
Monday, Aug. 14, 2017

If you are one of those who think they are unable to speak at meetings, or to do a little Twelve Step work, then give a try at some other AA activity. If you have a phone, you can always call up some new man and shoot the breeze with him. If you have a car, you can arrange to pick up some guy who hasn't got transportation and bring him to meetings. Or you gals can occasionally baby sit for someone who wants to attend meetings but can't get away.

There are lots of things you can do if you try. You once thought you couldn't quit drinking, but you did.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 14, 2017 - Good morning to a Monday of strengthened faith, hope, courage and gratitude


Sunday, August 13, 2017

Aug. 13, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Today's Gift from Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017
Today's thought from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is:

The block of granite which was an obstacle in the pathway of the weak becomes a stepping-stone in the pathway of the strong. That block of granite is often nothing more than a decision.
 -- Thomas Carlyle


Trails through national parks and forests are often clearly marked and well-maintained. But sometimes a heavy snowmelt or downpour can turn a trickling stream into a tricky obstacle that needs to be navigated in order to continue following the trail.

When this happens, hikers can turn around and postpone their hike until another day. They can attempt to create their own trail by rambling through – and possibly destroying – delicate forest undergrowth. They can slog through the water, soaking their footgear and creating discomfort for the rest of the hike. Or they can utilize the resources available to them, such as by positioning large rocks as stepping-stones to cross the stream.

How you navigate the trails of your recovery can be seen in similar terms. You must choose how to navigate these trails, both in times when the footling is good and when it is not. Be like the hiker who thinks first about how to handle the challenges, so you can continue safely along your journey.

Today I will make choices that will keep me on the path of recovery.
You are reading from the book:
52 Weeks of Conscious Contact © 2003 by Melody Beattie

Aug. 13, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Step by Step

Step by Step
Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

“When we became alcoholics, crushed by a self-imposed crisis we could not postpone or evade, we had to fearlessly face the proposition that either God is everything or else He is nothing. God either is, or He isn’t. What was our choice to be?
” …(W)e were squarely confronted with the question of faith. We couldn’t duck the issue. Some of us had already walked far over the Bridge of Reason toward the desired shore of faith. The outlines and the promise of the New Land had brought luster to tired eyes and fresh courage to flagging spirits. …We were grateful that Reason had brought us so far. But somehow, we couldn’t quite step ashore. Perhaps we had been leaning too heavily on Reason that last mile and we did not like to lose our support.” – Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, 1976, Ch 4 (“We Agnostics”), p 53.

Today, I couldn’t have reasoned myself into the condition that requires recovery without some faith even if I didn’t recognize it. Even now, after my baptism into the program, if I continue to resist ideas that a power called God or anything else led me into recovery, is it plausible that the same reasoning that pushed me to the edge of darkness also pulled me back? Regardless of the answer, if I still reject the possibility of a higher power or God or whatever else anyone calls a supreme being, maybe as my recovery progresses, I will at least become willing to consider there is a force stronger and greater than I. Today, I won’t debunk talk about a higher power by claiming my own reason for my recovery because, after all, it was my reasoning that contributed to me becoming an alcoholic. Maybe today will be the day I finally believe that something other than myself saved me. And our common journey continues. Step by step. – Chris M., 2017

Aug. 13, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Twenty-Four Hours a Day

Twenty-Four Hours a Day
Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

AA Thought for the Day
"We had but two alternatives; one was to go on to the bitter end, blotting out the consciousness of our intolerable situation as best we could, and the other was to accept spiritual help. We became willing to maintain a certain simple attitude toward life. What seems at first a flimsy reed has proved to be the loving and powerful hand of God. A new life has been given us, a design for living that really works. All of us establish in our own individual way our personal relationship with God."
Have I established my own relationship with God?

Meditation for the Day
Make it a daily practice to review your character. Take your character in relation to your daily life, to your dear ones, your friends, your acquaintances, and your work. Each day try to see where God wants you to change. Plan how best each fault can be eradicated or each mistake be corrected. Never be satisfied with a comparison with those around you. Strive toward a better life as your ultimate goal. God is your helper through weakness to power, through danger to security, through fear and worry to peace and serenity.

Prayer for the Day
I pray that I may make real progress toward a better life. I pray that I may never be satisfied with my present state.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 13, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: A Day at a Time

A Day at a Time
Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

Reflection for the Day
The Program's Fourth Step suggests that we make a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves. For some of us, no challenge seems more formidable; there's nothing more difficult than facing ourselves as we really are. We flee from one wrongdoing after another as they catch up with us, forever making excuses, pleading always that our virtues in other areas far outweigh our flaws. Yet once we become willing to look squarely and self-searchingly at ourselves, we're then able to illuminate the dark and negative side of our natures with new vision, action, and grace.
Am I willing to open my eyes and step out into the sunlight?

Today I Pray
May my Higher Power stop me in my tracks if I am running away from myself. For I will never overcome my misdeeds, or the flaws in my character which brought them about, by letting them chase me. May I slow down and turn to face them with the most trusty weapon I know - truth.

Today I Will Remember
I will not be a fugitive from myself.

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 13, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: The Eye Opener

The Eye Opener
Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

The men and women who are doing the bulk of the work in your Group seldom complain. They are too busy doing their job and yours to have the time. There is no time left for griping.

If things are not being run your way, maybe that is because you are doing nothing to "change the things you can."

Hazelden Foundation

Aug. 13, 2017 - Good morning to a Sunday of stronger faith, hope, strength and courage


Saturday, August 12, 2017

Aug. 12, 2017 - Readings in Recovery: Today's Gift from Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017
Today's thought from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is:

Accepting the past

Noted psychiatrist Carl Jung once said, "If one can accept one's sin, one can live with it. If one cannot accept it, one has to suffer the inevitable consequences." We must come to accept our past acts before they will stop causing us pain.

All the Steps help us do this, but in particular, Steps Four and Five (the inventory Steps) and Steps Eight and Nine (the amends Steps) help. If we attend to these Steps properly, we will no longer regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it.

Am I coming to accept myself?

Higher Power, help me accept the ways I've behaved in the past - and the ways I behave in the present - that cause me pain, so that in your time I may be freed.
You are reading from the book:
Day by Day © 1974, 1998 by Hazelden Foundation